Accessibility Checklist for Course Delivery

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Image with check marks for accessibility.

Course Accessibility Checklist

“Under the Information and Communications Standards, schools need to provide educational materials in accessible ways. For example, staff need to use accessible formats and communication supports when students need them.” AODA Requirements for Educational Institutions

Creating accessible documents when you first create them is a great time saver. If you have items in your current course that aren’t accessible, start small by updating items one at a time to a more accessible format, so if the time comes that you need to have accessible materials you are ready. Creating accessible documents and experiences takes time, so it is important to be as proactive as possible.

The following checklist asks a series of reflection questions. The more you answer ‘yes’ the more accessible your course materials and delivery are.

The Accessibility Checklist is available as a Google Doc, Word Doc, PDF, or Excel SpreadsheetThe checklist available on this page is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0. You may use the attribution “Accessibility Checklist / [Name of Resource]” by Cambrian College is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 4.0.

For Virtual Delivery

  • Do you wear a headset with a microphone for each Zoom session?
  • Do you turn on live transcriptions in Zoom?
  • Do you mute your microphone when not speaking?
  • Are you situated in a quiet space to eliminate background noises?
  • Are you situated in a well-lit area so people can see your face clearly?
  • At the beginning of the session, do you clearly state the agenda and which technologies will be used during the class?
  • When using the chat feature, do you read comments aloud for all students to hear?
  • Do you verbalize images, charts, or graphics that you share on the screen?
  • Do you alert students when you are launching a poll?

For PowerPoint Presentations

  • Do you use PowerPoint’s built-in Accessibility Checker to ensure your slide deck meets accessibility requirements?
  • Did you use pre-programmed themes/layouts?
  • Did you apply appropriate colour contrast for easy visibility?
  • Did you use a sans-serif font (Arial, Helvetica, Verdana, etc.)?
  • Did you select font sizes that are large enough to be seen on screen and across a classroom?
  • Did you avoid using inaccessible PowerPoint features?
    • Example: Word Art, text boxes, text shadows, glow effects for fonts, etc.
  • Did you apply alt-text to all images, charts, graphics, and visuals?
    • Consider the content and function of your image when creating alt-text
    • If the image provides content, ensure the content is included in the alt-text
  • Did you use descriptive hyperlinks in your text?
    • Avoid using ‘Click here’ and opt for a more descriptive verb or short phrase
  • A screen reader will read slides in a particular order; verify the order in which each slide is arranged to ensure the information is read in a logical order. Are you verifying the order in which elements in each slide will be read to ensure the information is read in a logical order?
  • Did you avoid the use of unnecessary slide transitions?

For Microsoft Word

  • Did you use Word’s built-in Accessibility Checker to ensure your document meets accessibility requirements?
  • Did you use the pre-formatted ‘Styles’ to confirm the order and importance of sections?
  • Are all images in your document accurately described with alt-text?
  • Have you ‘text wrapped your text in line with the image(s)?
  • Have you used the Columns function in the Layout tab to ensure your columns are formatted properly for screenreaders?
  • Have you used the ‘Page numbers’ function on the Insert tab to add page numbers to your document?
  • Do your tables have headings correctly identified using the pre-formatted table styles in the Table Designs tab?
  • Did you use descriptive hyperlinks in your text?
    • Avoid using ‘Click here’ and opt for a more descriptive verb or short phrase
  • Did you avoid using inaccessible Word features?
    • Ex. Text boxes, Word art, Drop Caps, Quick parts, etc.

Moodle

  • Did you use a sans-serif font (Arial, Helvetica, Verdana, etc.)?
  • Did you use appropriate headings in Moodle and elsewhere to ensure a screen reader can interpret the order and importance of sections?
  • Did you ensure all images, diagrams, charts, and other visuals (including animations) are accurately described with alt-text?
  • Did you apply appropriate colour contrast for easy visibility?
  • Did you use descriptive hyperlinks in your text?
  • Did you include closed captions for all videos in your Moodle shell and PPT slides?
  • For any YouTube video with errors in closed captions or where closed captions are missing, have you included an accurate transcript?

Other Accessibility Considerations

Email

  • Did you use Outlook’s built-in Accessibility Checker to ensure your email meets accessibility requirements?
  • Did you use HTML format?
  • Did you use an accessible font (sans-serif font/readable size)?
  • Did you provide structure to your email by using the pre-formatted Styles in the Format Text tab?
  • Did you insert alt-text for embedded images?
  • Did you wrap text in line with images?
  • Did you use descriptive hyperlinks in your text?
    • Avoid using ‘Click here’ and opt for a more descriptive verb or short phrase
  • Is your email signature accessible?

Video

  • Have you included closed captions for all videos in your Moodle shell and PPT slides?
  • For any YouTube video with errors in closed captions or where closed captions are missing, have you included an accurate transcript?
  • Did you use a microphone to capture your voice clearly?
  • Did you record yourself in an area with minimal background noise?

PDF Documents

  • Are PDFs included in your Moodle shell accessible? Conduct an accessibility check to verify.